Author: Lexi Wagor

15 Apr Stand for the Land at Bainbridge Brewing on May 10th

Drink local beer to support local conservation! Come celebrate the Land Trust and support Stand for the Land at Bainbridge Brewing’s Brewery & Taproom. From 5 to 8 pm on May 10th, Bainbridge Brewing will donate $2 from every pint of beer sold to Stand for the Land. That’s A Some Pizza is available next door for slices or pies, plus they have other snacks, soft drinks, and ciders at the Brewery. We hope to see you there! Questions? Feel free to give us a call at (206) 842-1216 or email Lexi.

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25 Mar Kitsap Great Give is April 19th!

The Kitsap Great Give is a 24-hour “give-day” event that unites our community through a special online donation platform to support the many nonprofit organizations that make Kitsap a great place to live – for all of us. Presented by Kitsap Community Foundation and the United Way of Kitsap County, this annual “community movement of generosity” has resulted in more than $12 million in community support since 2014. Mark your calendars for April 19th, 2022 to join in on the Kitsap Great Give. Funds raised through the Kitsap Great Give help the Land Trust to further our mission of conserving and stewarding the diverse natural environment of Bainbridge Island – for all! Give to the Bainbridge Island Land through the Kitsap Great Give.  

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07 Mar April’s Free Invasive Disposal Days Are Back!

Sundays, April 17 and 24 from 10am to 4pm. We’re here to help you get your yard in order with two days of FREE Invasive Weed Disposal! Bring your weeds to the transfer station and the Land Trust will cover the cost of disposal. Invasive plant targets are Scotch broom, English holly, English ivy, Himalayan blackberry, tansy ragwort, English laurel, and the noxious weeds on King county’s “Noxious Weed” list. Please do not mix in non-invasive yard waste. For questions about whether or not something will be accepted, email Andrew Fraser, Land Trust Stewardship Manager, or call (206) 842-1216. Invasive plant species are one of the leading causes of vegetation biodiversity loss. They spread quickly and can displace native plants, prevent new native plant growth, and create monocultures. Lack of diversity among native plants reduces the quality and quantity of fish and wildlife habitat. Remove your invasives now while the ground is soft and make room for native plants come fall and winter when the weather is best for planting! Resources: The Land Trust’s Invasive Weed Primer Jeannette Franks’ Despicable 6 King County Noxious Weed List Bainbridge Island Cooperative Weed Management Area Priority Weeds A special thanks to Bainbridge Disposal for helping facilitate this important event. If you are interested in volunteering for the invasive disposal effort, please email Lexi.

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15 Feb Celebrate Black History in Conservation

February is Black History Month The Land Trust joins the country in observing Black History Month, which celebrates Black excellence and recognizes the ongoing struggle that Black people have faced for hundreds of years in America. Despite underrepresentation, Black Americans have and continue to play critical roles in the conservation and environmental movements of this country. The work of the Bainbridge Island Land Trust is to conserve and steward the diverse natural environments of Bainbridge Island for the benefit of all. We envision a future where conservation is the work of diverse community partners and is inclusive, equitable, and just. We are seeking opportunities to better reflect the historic and present-day diversity of local people and communities through fairness, justice, and equity. We’ve compiled a list of resources to celebrate and support the many contributions related to the outdoors by the Black and African American community. The Land Trust encourages you to join us in learning from Black voices and experiences! LEARN 10 Black Conservationists Who Made History 6 Black Conservationists and Environmental Activists to Celebrate African Americans in Conservation: Young Black Conservationists to Know READ Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors by Carolyn Finney Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry Edited by Camille T. Dungy The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature by J. Drew Lanham Trace: Memory, History, Race and the American Landscape by Lauret Savoy WATCH #EveryoneOutside Episode 001: Nailah Blades Wylie & Color Outside Recolor the Outdoors | Alex Bailey | TEDxSanAntonio
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15 Feb Volunteer with the Seattle Urban Carnivore Project

Wildlife Camera Trapping Research on Bainbridge Island Woodland Park Zoo (WPZ) and Seattle University scientists collaborated to launch the Seattle Urban Carnivore Project (SUCP) in 2019. This effort explores how carnivores—those in the scientific order Carnivora such as coyotes, black bears, raccoons, and bobcats—live and interact with people across the greater Seattle area. Researchers and volunteers with the Seattle Urban Carnivore Project deploy over 40 wildlife cameras across the greater Seattle area following the study design established by UWIN, the Urban Wildlife Information Network, coordinated by Lincoln Park Zoo’s Urban Wildlife Institute. The cameras are located within green spaces along either a north transect, a south transect or off-transect. The transects lie along an urban-to-rural gradient in the greater Seattle area and project volunteers manage about two-thirds of the camera stations. On Bainbridge Island, the cameras are located on Land Trust properties. We are currently recruiting returning and new volunteers to join the effort for the next season (the camera trapping season runs April 2022 – March 2023). Want to learn more? Read the full description here. Training (required; via Zoom) – Saturday, March 12th from 9:30  – 11:30 a.m. To sign-up as a volunteer and let us know your site and training preferences (make sure to note Bainbridge Island as your area preference!), please complete this form by 2/25:https://forms.gle/wYY2NXUCAbnP6RNK9

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15 Feb Species Spotlight: River Otter (Lutra canadensis)

Did you know river otters can hold their breath for up to 8 minutes while under water? They can even close their nostrils to keep water out during long dives. The playful river otter spends about two thirds of its time on land, but is an expert swimmer so it can use the water to travel and seek out food. These mammals have long, slim bodies with short, webbed feet and long, strong tails – allowing them to swim upwards of seven miles per hour and dive to depths of 60 feet! As you probably know, the waters around here can be quite cold! To combat the often frigid water temperatures, river otters have a thick protective coat. In order to keep their fur water resistant and properly insulating, otters have to groom themselves frequently. They wash themselves after every meal! Often spotted from the many shorelines of Bainbridge Island, the river otter is sometimes mistaken for its significantly larger cousin the sea otter. But what’s the difference between the two? The most obvious difference is size: a river otter is only about half to a third of the size of a sea otter. River otters swim with their bellies down, while sea otters float on their backs at the water’s surface. Sea otters also have short and stubby tails in comparison to those of river otters. Sea otters do not reside in Puget Sound, they are only found along the coast and occasionally in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. River otters are found all over the state, and across much of North America! River otters are pretty adaptable and can live in nearly any habitat near water as long as there is enough food around. These creatures have high metabolisms and have to eat frequently. Luckily, they will…

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13 Jan Conservation Success: 10-Acre Property Transfer Expands the Grand Forest

10 acres, 7 years, 5 partners. Looking into the property from the Cross Island Trail in the Grand Forest.  © Paul Brians If you’re traveling through Grand Forest West and headed towards Hilltop, you’ll pass a large swath of lush, mature forest to the south not long before you reach the switchbacks. In fact, two main trails border this parcel. Because of its near-pristine nature, one might think it was already protected – and now it is. Thanks to a common vision of conservation between the landowner and a great many partners and supporters, this woodland will soon be a part of the Grand Forest This 10-acre property was on the mind of many Islanders when discussions to conserve it began in 2014. Not long after in 2015, the Land Trust launched the Grand Forest Grander campaign to purchase the parcel as well as two others in the vicinity. Fast forward through hundreds of hours of negotiations to 2021, and the Land Trust paid off the property with community-raised funds. This multi-year effort expands on our partnership properties. The Land Trust is transferring the ownership, care, and stewardship of this special parcel to the Bainbridge Island Metro Park & Recreation District (BIMPRD) to expand the Grand Forest complex.

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13 Jan Species Spotlight: Coyote (Canis latrans)

“The wolf we tried to erase but ended up in our backyard.” – Dan Flores, author of Coyote America. A snowy coyote stares at our camera trap located in the Wildlife Corridor. For most of us, coyotes are more often seen than heard with their howling and yips echoing through the night skies. In fact, their Latin name, Canis latrans, can be translated to “barking dog.” These incredibly intelligent creatures use about a dozen different vocalizations to communicate with each other. One of the most resilient carnivores in North America, the coyote is one of the species often captured in the photos collected by our remote wildlife cameras. Coyotes belong to the genus Canis, which also includes the gray wolves that used to roam most of this continent. Now, there are 19 subspecies of coyote that can be found in almost every ecosystem in North America. So why have coyotes been able to thrive? To put it simply, the coyote specializes in adaptability. Back in 2019, one of our cameras snapped this photo of a coyote making a meal of a large opossum! While most wild animals tend to stick to natural landscapes, coyotes can live in suburban and urban habitats. Bainbridge Island Land Trust volunteers help monitor coyote activity on the Island through the Seattle Urban Carnivore Project. This project, launched by Woodland Park Zoo and Seattle University in 2019, studies how carnivores like coyotes, raccoons, otters, and bears live and interact with people in such landscapes in an effort to support our coexistence. Community science is critical to this project. Teams of volunteers regularly check and maintain motion-activated “camera traps” that remotely capture photos of animals passing through. These photos are used to gather data about how these carnivores use these spaces. According to the Carnivore Spotter Annual…

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07 Jan Save the Date – 2022 Annual Meeting & Open House

Just like last year, we are taking our Annual Meeting virtual. The program will be available to watch on our website on January 28th. Voting to confirm the 2022 Board Slate is open now – click here to vote. But we miss you, and the land does too! So, we’ve come up with an additional exciting opportunity for our community to supplement our virtual meeting. The Land Trust is delighted to announce a new element of this year’s Annual Meeting – an “open house” on one of our Preserves. Drop by any time between 10 am and 1 pm on Saturday, January 29th to tour Springbrook Creek Preserve, learn about the importance of the watershed, and get to know the Land Trust. Bring your families, friends, and neighbors – this is a community event! Springbrook Creek Preserve is an incredible, diverse 23-acre property that encompasses meadows, a wetland and a stream, and a mature upland forest. With the Preserve not yet open to the public, this is an event that you won’t want to miss. Please be prepared for wet weather and uneven, muddy terrain. Tours will be running on a drop-in basis, and we will send groups out as they arrive. This is a great opportunity to learn from our knowledgeable staff out in the field, who will be set up at different stations throughout the property. Binoculars are recommended for those who enjoy birds and wildlife! Pastries and warm drinks will be available for your enjoyment! To minimize waste, we ask that you bring your own thermos or mug. Whether you are interested in stopping by for a coffee and a chat or to take the tour of Springbrook Creek Preserve, we hope to see you there! Questions about the open house? Email Lexi or call our office at (206)…

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